F A Q
1. How is sugar produced from sugar beets?
Beet sugar processing normally is accomplished in one continuous process. During the process, the natural sugar stored in the beet root is separated from the rest of the plant material. The sugar beets are washed, sliced and boiled in water to begin the sugar extraction process. The resulting sugar-containing juice is filtered, concentrated to a thick syrup by boiling where the sugar begins to crystallize, washed with hot water in a rapidly spinning centrifuge to separate sugar and molasses and dried in a series of steps. After sugar and molasses have been recovered from the sugar beet, the remaining pulp is utilized for animal feed.

2. How is sugar produced from sugar cane?
During the process, the natural sugar stored in the cane stalk is separated from the rest of the plant material. This separation begins by grinding the cane and boiling it in water to begin the sugar extraction process. The sugar-containing juice is boiled until it thickens into a syrup from which the sugar crystallizes, the crystals are spun in a centrifuge where a portion of the molasses is removed to produce raw sugar, and the raw sugar is traditionally dried before shipment to a refinery. At the refinery, the raw sugar is mixed with water in a rapidly spinning centrifuge to remove the last remaining molasses. The white sugar is then crystallized, dried and packaged.

3. Is there a difference between sugar derived from sugar beets or sugar cane?
The sugar is the same no matter its original plant source or growing practice. Sugar whether from sugar beets or sugar cane, or from sugar crops grown using conventional, biotech, or organic methods is pure and natural and has the same nutritional value, composition and wholesomeness.

4. What is sugar?
Sugars are a major form of carbohydrates and are found probably in all green plants they occur in significant amounts in most fruits and vegetables there are three main simple sugars sucrose, fructose, glucose, sucrose is in fact a combination of fructose and glucose and the body quickly breaks down into these separate substances

5. The need for energy
All energy stored in food is derived originally from the sun and it is made by green plant life. The sun's energy acts upon the green chemical "chlorophyll" in the leaves of plants to produce sugars and Starches from the carbon-dioxide in the atmosphere and the water from the roots by a process known as Photosynthesis .These carbohydrates (starches and sugar) acts as a plants food and energy supply. .The Energy need of human body is largely dependent on the carbohydrates that are derived from plants.

6. Sugar role Starches provide the large part of our carbohydrate needs .The sugar which nature provides alongside the starches in our food supply have also a very special role to play in human metabolism for primitive man the sweet taste probably acted as a signal that the food was safe to eat .For modern man sugar is used to improve the palatability of many foods and can thereby encourage a more varied diet. 7. The use of sugar in foods Sucrose is a natural and economical sweetener .It is the most versatile of all the sweeteners, performing many useful functions in a range of foods - As a sweetener. - Acting as a preservative. - Enhancing flavour in foods - Providing bulk and texture in ice cream, custard, baked goods and confectionary. - Acting as a food for yeast in baking and brewing beer and cider. - Contributing to crust colour and flavour and delaying staleness in cakes and biscuits. 8. Sugars role
  • Sugar has medical value
    Apart from sugar being a cheapest instant source of energy ,It has several medical & therapentical Values some of them are as elaborated below
  • Sugar for oral rehyderation
    Sugar is extremely valuable in treatment of serve infantile diarrhea, a serious problem that kills around 3.5 million children in a year in underdeveloped countries .Oral re-hydration treatment (restoring of liquids by mouth) is used for infants with diarrhea due to cholera or re-hydrating viruses . It is simpler and easier to mix sugar with salt to treat de-hydration children even in The most remote areas .Further studies prove that oral sucrose was an effective as intravenous Treatment in retaining re-hydration.
  • sugar is best carrier of vitamine A and minerals
    Vitamin A deficiency in South American population is being combated successfully with the use of fortified sugar .Encouraged by the results ,fortification of sugar with vitamin A is being attempted to combat vitamin A as well as mineral (iron ) deficiencies a major area of concern In some of the developing countries.

9. Chemical sweeteners
From time to time a number of chemical sweeteners were produced and used by the public. With passage of time and further research, some of these had to be banned as being harmful to health. It took quite some time before such conclusions could be reached. In the meanwhile, gullible public were induced into consumption of such harmful chemical sweeteners. A few such instances are as follows:
Likewise some of the recently introduced chemical sweeteners may subsequently prove to be a health hazard since scientific research is a continuous process. Consumption of such products may thus be beset with unknown risk which may become known later at a stage when damage may have been caused due to their consumption over a period of time. On the other hand, sugar, whether expressed in terms of sucrose or fructose is a natural product and is a wonderful gift of nature to the mankind. It has many virtues and cannot cause health hazard unless misused. Therefore, the risk evaluation between sugar consumption and that of chemical sweeteners must take this important factor into account.

10. Sugar has medical value Apart from sugar being a cheapest instant source of energy, It has several medical & therapeutically Values some of them are as elaborated below
  1. Sugar for oral rehyderation
    Sugar is extremely valuable in treatment of serve infantile diarrhea, a serious problem that kills around 3.5 million children in a year in underdeveloped countries .Oral re-hydration treatment (restoring of liquids by mouth) is used for infants with diarrhea due to cholera or re-hydrating viruses . It is simpler and easier to mix sugar with salt to treat de-hydration children even in The most remote areas .Further studies prove that oral sucrose was an effective as intravenous Treatment in retaining re-hydration
  2. Sugar is best carrier of vitamine A and minerals
    Vitamin A deficiency in South American population is being combated successfully with the use of fortified sugar .Encouraged by the results ,fortification of sugar with vitamin A is being attempted to combat vitamin A as well as mineral (iron ) deficiencies a major area of concern In some of the developing countries.
  3. Chemical Sweeteners From time to time a number of chemical sweeteners were produced and used by the public. With passage of time and further research, some of these had to be banned as being harmful to health. It took quite some time before such conclusions could be reached. In the meanwhile, gullible public were induced into consumption of such harmful chemical sweeteners.
    A few such instances are as follows: Likewise some of the recently introduced chemical sweeteners may subsequently prove to be a health hazard since scientific research is a continuous process. Consumption of such products may thus be beset with unknown risk which may become known later at a stage when damage may have been caused due to their consumption over a period of time. On the other hand, sugar, whether expressed in terms of sucrose or fructose is a natural product and is a wonderful gift of nature to the mankind. It has many virtues and cannot cause health hazard unless misused. Therefore, the risk evaluation between sugar consumption and that of chemical sweeteners must take this important factor into account.


11. What are carbon credits?
Carbon credits are generated by enterprises in the developing world that shift to cleaner technologies and thereby save on energy consumption, consequently reducing their greenhouse gas emissions. For each tonne of carbon dioxide (the major GHG) emission avoided, the entity can get a carbon emission certificate which they can sell either immediately or through a futures market, just like any other commodity.

The certificates are sold to entities in rich countries, like power utilities, who have emission reduction targets to achieve and find it cheaper to buy 'offsetting' certificates rather than do a clean-up in their own backyard.

This trade is carried out under a UN-mandated international convention on climate change to help rich countries reduce their emissions.
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